Patient Experience Priorities

Accordion

The second group relates to patient experience.

Click on each of the titles below to learn more and then vote for which of the four you think we should prioritise.

Why this has been chosen as priority?

Open communication with patients approaching the end of their life can enable better, more personalised care that focuses on what matters to them. In healthcare we need to enable clinicians to initiate and have honest conversations with people earlier in their end-of-life journey so they can make informed decisions about their own care and support. Open and honest discussion enables people to develop personalised care and support plans which can then be shared with others involved in their care, including those important to them.

What are we going to do?

  • Put patients at the heart of decision making
  • Equip senior decision makers with tools that will help them to identify those patients likely to die in the next year and have open and honest conversations with them about their wishes
  • Openly discuss reaching the end of their life and explore patient and family wishes, including preferred place of care and how much intervention they would want
  • Improve access to advance care planning across the organisation and ensure that any information is shared with all relevant people
  • Participate in the national Dying Matters week
  • Seek views on care from bereaved family members
  • Use learning and stories from complaints in education and awareness sessions across the organisation

Why is this a priority?

Dementia presents a huge challenge to society and will continue to do so increasingly in the future. Sussex has the highest prevalence of dementia in the country and rates are predicted to increase as the population ages and an estimated 25% of all hospital beds are occupied by people with dementia. People living with dementia experience worse outcomes than those of the general population following a hospital admission.

What are we going to do?

  • Fully introduce Communication and Interaction Training (CAIT). This a person-centred training programme for supporting people with dementia whose emotions and actions communicate signs of unmet needs. The CAIT approach highlights that good communication skills are vital when supporting a person who is living with dementia
  • Identify priority areas for trainers across the trust and a trainer selection criteria
  • Support trainers with mentoring, peer supervision and additional modular training to embed and sustain practice
  • Work with our colleagues across the Sussex Integrated Care System (ICS) to break down the CAIT programme and develop bite sized deliverables that will enable trainers to deliver practical training ‘on the job’
  • Integrate information on patient records about factors that cause distress or agitation for the patient and actions that can calm patients
  • Develop documentation for communication plans within the patient record to capture information from the patient’s family or carer on preferences and support needs of the patient
  • Develop staff surveys for services with an allocated CAIT trainer, to measure the ongoing effectiveness of the training
  • Determine reliability of incident reporting for services including frailty and intermediate care

Why is this a priority?

High-quality translation and interpretation are vital to ensuring that people access the health and care services they are entitled to and understand their treatment, the provision of professional interpretation and translation:

  • Ensures accuracy and impartiality of interpreting
  • Minimises the risk of misinterpretation of crucial clinical information (for example, informed consent to undergo clinical treatments and procedures)
  • Minimises safeguarding risk (for example, for victims of human trafficking)
  • Allows family members and friends to attend appointments and support the patient (emotionally and with decision-making) without the added pressure of needing to foster trust with the patient

What are we going to do?

  • Implement new arrangements for access to translation and interpretation services
  • Roll out staff communications and training as required, for staff responsible for supporting patients’ communication needs

Why is this a priority?

  • Unpaid carers provide critical support for people with health and social care needs.
  • Involving carers in care planning, shared decision making and service review is a legal duty (Health and Care Act 2022); Section 91 introduces a new duty for NHS trusts and foundation trusts to involve patients and carers (including young carers) in discharge planning.
  • Research indicates that carers face psychological, financial, physical and social stress which impacts on their own health and wellbeing and may also bring health and other benefits to the person they care for.
  • Early identification of and support to carers can enable them to reduce stress, manage their own health, improve psychological and financial wellbeing and reduce isolation
  • The Carer Hub in East Sussex (Care for the Carers) already works with the trust and is keen to extend this role and has bid for additional ICB funding to do this.

What are we going to do?

  • Deliver Think Carer training (in a range of ways) to staff in acute settings
  • Develop a Carers Passport for use across the trust
  • Increase the identification and registration of carers with Care for the Carers
  • Increase the awareness of acute based staff around the need for carer involvement and the associated benefits to services and patients
  • Increase wider support to carers through effective signposting, tailored offers and networking